Say goodbye to Whittingham

BBs
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Say goodbye to Whittingham

Postby BBs » Sat Sep 20, 2014 4:32 pm

This site has been produced by Phil Knapman and Ken Ashton as a result of research into the origins and history, through to the closure of Whittingham Hospital. We would like to record out sincere thanks to all the people and agencies who have rendered us assistance in this project.

An extract from the booklet "Whittingham Hospital - One Hundred Years 1873 - 1973": "No matter what the future, Whittingham Hospital can hold its head high with pride. It has contributed to the welfare and comfort of countless people who otherwise would have spent their days in misery. It has played its part in the development of treatment for the mentally ill. It is still sturdy in stature capable of meeting any reasonable demands made upon it. It stands as a monument to the fact that wisdom does not decrease with age. 'For as much as all knowledge beginneth from experience, therefore also new experience is the beginning of new knowledge'....(Hobbes)

Whittingham Hospital opened officially on 1st April 1873, built by bricks made on site, the source being what became to be known as the "duck pond" but referred to on maps as the "fish pond". The kiln for the manufacture of the bricks was situated, apparently, in what is known "Super's Hill Woods", at the back of the hospital, on the road to Grimsargh. The hospital was built in four "phases", the first being St Luke's (the Main), followed by St John's (the Annex), then Cameron House, and lastly St Margaret's (the New or West Annex). In addition to these 'divisions' there was also a Sanatorium of fourteen beds built for Infectious Diseases, which became known as Fryars' Villa, later to become part of the accomodation for the resident staff. The hospital served the community for almost 150 years, and, in its' day, was a virtually self sufficient community.

Proposal for an additional Asylum within Lancashire was called for and, following decisions as a result of the Local Government Act of 1888, it was decided to build an Asylum. The first choice of site was just behind Fulwood Barracks in Preston, but this gave way to a preferential site at Got Field Farm, to be known as Whittingham. This site was chosen, primarily, because there was a good natural supply of fresh water more readily available than other sites, and it was within easy reach of Preston.
Unfortunately this is now being totally demolished,All the building are nearly been bulldozed down.

BBs
Site Moderator
Posts: 238
Joined: Mon May 19, 2014 2:12 pm

Re: Say goodbye to Whittingham

Postby BBs » Sat Sep 20, 2014 5:03 pm

DD and i went the other week,Same day as Camelot,We decided just to take a wander and have a look for ourselfs.And sadly this is all is what remains of this fantastic building plus all the oputbuildings that belong to Whittingham.
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BBs
Site Moderator
Posts: 238
Joined: Mon May 19, 2014 2:12 pm

Re: Say goodbye to Whittingham

Postby BBs » Sat Sep 20, 2014 5:16 pm

More.
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x_plore
Posts: 7
Joined: Mon May 19, 2014 2:07 pm

Re: Say goodbye to Whittingham

Postby x_plore » Tue Sep 30, 2014 10:32 pm

such a shame :(


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